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The brief wondrous life of Oscar Wao / Junot Diaz.

Book Book (2007.)
Description: 339 p. ; 22 cm.
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Riverhead Books, 2007.
17 of 19 copies available at NOBLE (All Libraries). (Show all copies)
1 of 1 copy available at Lynnfield.
0 current holds with 19 total copies.
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Lynnfield Adult Fiction Fiction / Diaz, J. (Text to Phone) Available -

  • ISBN: 9781594489587 (hardcover) :
  • ISBN: 1594489580 (hardcover) :
General Note:
Winner of the National Book Critics Award for Fiction for 2007
Summary:
The author's dark and exuberant first novel makes a compelling case for the multiperspectival view ... Read More
Awards:
National Book Critics Award for Fiction, 2007
Citation: Díaz, Junot. "The brief wondrous life of Oscar Wao." New York, N.Y. : Riverhead Books, 2007.
 
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020 . ‡a9781594489587 (hardcover) : ‡c$24.95
020 . ‡a1594489580 (hardcover) : ‡c$24.95
035 . ‡a(OCoLC)123539681 ‡z(OCoLC)148890922
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1001 . ‡aDíaz, Junot, ‡d1968-
24514. ‡aThe brief wondrous life of Oscar Wao / ‡cJunot Diaz.
260 . ‡aNew York, N.Y. : ‡bRiverhead Books, ‡c2007.
300 . ‡a339 p. ; ‡c22 cm.
500 . ‡aWinner of the National Book Critics Award for Fiction for 2007
520 . ‡aThe author's dark and exuberant first novel makes a compelling case for the multiperspectival view of a life, wherein an individual cannot be known or understood in isolation from the history of his family and his nation. Oscar being a first generation Dominican American, the nation in question is really two nations. And Dominicans in this novel being explicitly of mixed Taino, African and Spanish descent, the very ideas of nationhood and nationality are thoughtfully, subtly complicated. The various nationalities and generations are subtended by the recurring motif of fuku, the Curse and Doom of the New World, whose midwife and victim was a historical personage Diaz will only call the Admiral, in deference to the belief that uttering his name brings bad luck (he arrived in the New World in 1492 and his initials are CC). By the prologue's end, it is clear that this story of one poor guy's cursed life will also be the story of how 500 years of historical and familial bad luck shape the destiny of its fat, sad, smart, lovable and short-lived protagonist. The book's pervasive sense of doom is offset by a rich and playful prose that embodies its theme of multiple nations, cultures and languages, often shifting in a single sentence from English to Spanish, from Victorian formality to Negropolitan vernacular, from Homeric epithet to dirty bilingual insult. Even the presumed reader shape shifts in the estimation of its in your face narrator, who addresses us variously as folks, you folks, conspiracy minded fools, Negro, Nigger and plataneros. So while Diaz assumes in his reader the same considerable degree of multicultural erudition he himself possesses, offering no gloss on his many unitalicized Spanish words and expressions (thus beautifully dramatizing how linguistic borders, like national ones, are porous), or on his plethora of genre and canonical literary allusions, he does helpfully footnote aspects of Dominican history, especially those concerning the bloody 30 year reign of President Rafael Leonidas Trujillo.
586 . ‡aNational Book Critics Award for Fiction, 2007
650 0. ‡aDominican Americans ‡vFiction.
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