Book

The Irish way : becoming American in the multiethnic city / James R. Barrett.

  • ISBN: 9781594203251 (hardcover) :
  • ISBN: 1594203253 (hardcover) :
  • Description: 384 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 25 cm.
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Penguin Press,

Available copies

  • 8 copies at NOBLE (All Libraries).

Current holds

0 current holds with 9 total copies.

Library Location Call Number Status Due Date
Danvers Adult Nonfiction E 184 I6 B273 2012 (Text to phone) Available -
Gloucester Adult Nonfiction 305.89162/Barrett (Text to phone) Available -
Lynnfield Adult Nonfiction E 184.16 .I6 B273 2012 (Text to phone) Available -
Melrose Nonfiction (Second Floor) 305.89 Barrett (Text to phone) Available -
North Shore - Lynn Campus Stacks E 184 .I6 B273 2012 (Text to phone) Available -
Salem State University Stacks E 184 .I6 B273 2012 (Text to phone) Available -
Stoneham Adult Nonfiction Mezzanine 305.8916 BAR (Text to phone) Checked out 03/13/2014
Swampscott Thomson Room 305.891 B (Text to phone) Available -
Wakefield Adult Nonfiction (2nd Floor) 973.04 IRISH Barrett (Text to phone) Available -

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-366) and index.
Contents Note: The street -- The parish -- The workplace -- The stage -- The machine -- The nation.
Summary: This street-level history of turn-of-the-century urban life explores the Americanizing influence of the Irish on successive waves of migrants to the American city. The author, a historian chronicles how a new urban American identity was forged in the interactions between immigrants in the streets, saloons, churches, and workplaces of the American city. For good or ill, he contends, this process of Americanization was shaped largely by the Irish. From Boston to Chicago, newer waves of immigrants and African Americans found it nearly impossible to avoid the entrenched Irish. While other historians have long emphasized the role of settlement houses and other mainstream institutions in Americanizing immigrants, the author makes the original case that the culture absorbed by newcomers had a distinctly Hibernian cast. Drawing on contemporary sociological studies, Irish American literature, and newspaper accounts, this book recounts how the interactions between the Irish and later immigrants helped to forge a multiethnic American identity that has a profound legacy in our cities today.
Subject: Irish > United States > History > 19th century.
Irish > United States > History > 20th century.
National characteristics, Irish.
City and town life > United States > History > 19th century.
City and town life > United States > History > 20th century.
Cultural pluralism > United States.
Ireland > Emigration and immigration.
United States > Emigration and immigration.